brook armistead

Research

Brooke’s research focuses on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal placental development, which can result in pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. The preeclamptic placenta is characterized by an anti-angiogenic environment due to aberrant trophoblast differentiation and invasion. In normal pregnancy, the transcription factor PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor – γ) regulates critical aspects of placentation that are disrupted in preeclampsia. Brooke’s research investigates how PPARγ is involved in the insufficient trophoblast invasion and anti-angiogenic environment of the preeclamptic placenta. The ultimate aim of Brooke’s research is to identify PPARγ-related pathways that could be targeted for possible therapeutic intervention in preeclamptic patients.

Recent Publications

  1. Kadam L*, Armistead B*, Kohan-Ghadr HR, Drewlo S. 2020. PPARγ-GCM1 signaling mediated expression of FLT1 in the human placenta. PlosOne. In review.  *Authors contributed equally
  2. Drewlo S, Armistead B, Johnson E, Kadam L, Kohan-Ghadr HR. 2020. Epigenetic modulation during pregnancy and pregnancy related disorders, in Epigenetics and Reproductive health. Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Book Chapter, In press.
  3. Armistead B, Johnson E, Kadam L, VanderKamp R, Kula-Eversole E, Kohan-Ghadr HR, Drewlo S. 2020. Placental regulation of energy homeostasis during human pregnancy. Endocrinology, 161(7), 32417921.
  4. Armistead B, Kadam L, Drewlo S, Kohan-Ghadr HR. 2020. The role of NFκB in healthy and preeclamptic placenta: trophoblast in the spotlight. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 12(5):1775, 32150832.
  5. Drewlo S, Johnson E, Kilburn B, Kadam L, Armistead B, Kohan-Ghadr HR.  2020. Irisin induces trophoblast differentiation via AMPK activation in the human placenta. Journal of Cellular Physiology, 235(10):7146-7158, 32020629.

brook armistead cellsOutreach Project

Brooke participates in the yearly event, MSU Girl’s Math and Science Day, which welcomes girls from local elementary and middle schools to interact with MSU graduate students and scientists to learn about important science-related topics. This past year, Brooke has enjoyed helping teach the students about DNA extractions from fruit.